CVF in the News

By Peter Kronish, WHO.WHAT.WHY., November 2, 2020

Excerpts:

Are you here to vote?” Arianna asked two men and a woman approaching the basement entrance to the Hollywood Hotel’s ballroom in Los Angeles. “Just go in and make a right. Tell them if you’re dropping off your ballot so you don’t have to wait.” In less than 15 minutes, the three voters strode back out of the doorway and up the steps to the street, “I Voted” stickers on display. 

“There really are so many ways to safely vote here in LA County,” Arianna, a 30-year-old poll volunteer, told WhoWhatWhy. “In my opinion, there really is no good excuse to not get out there and exercise your right to vote.” 

By Peter Kronish, Who.What.Why., November 2, 2020

Excerpts:

“Are you here to vote?” Arianna asked two men and a woman approaching the basement entrance to the Hollywood Hotel’s ballroom in Los Angeles. “Just go in and make a right. Tell them if you’re dropping off your ballot so you don’t have to wait.” In less than 15 minutes, the three voters strode back out of the doorway and up the steps to the street, “I Voted” stickers on display. 

“There really are so many ways to safely vote here in LA County,” Arianna, a 30-year-old poll volunteer, told WhoWhatWhy. “In my opinion, there really is no good excuse to not get out there and exercise your right to vote.” 

By Cheri Carlson, VC Star, October 30, 2020

Exceprts:

Starting Saturday, people can vote in person at 48 locations in Ventura County.

Because of the pandemic, special rules allowed counties to have fewer places for voters to cast their ballots in person. But they also had to be open four days instead of just one.

"If they're planning to vote in person, please, please, please take advantage of the Oct. 31, Nov. 1 and Nov. 2 dates," said Miranda Nobriga, spokeswoman for the county elections division. "Do not wait until Election Day."

In previous elections, voters were assigned to one of hundreds of polling places. This time, voters can show up at any of the 48 spots. That means, popular times or locations could be far busier than in the past, leading to longer lines and delays.

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When should I vote?

By Aaron Mendelson, Laist, October 30, 2020

Excerpts:

In Los Angeles, election officials have already received 2.1 million ballots. In Orange County, the figure is nearing 750,000. And across the United States, more than 80 million ballots have been cast. 

Do the sky-high early voting numbers mean we'll see record turnout in 2020?

They're certainly a good sign, experts say. But thanks to California's voter-friendly laws, it takes weeks to tally every ballot, and that means we may not know the precise turnout figures until after Thanksgiving.

Millions of ballots have already arrived at counting centers, but election officials still have to process them. That involves checking signatures, tallying write-in votes and inspecting damaged ballots.

Other votes will arrive on election night. In Los Angeles, some are transported to counting centers by sheriff's deputies in helicopters and on boats.

By Chris Nichols, Captal Public Radio, October 30, 2020

Excepts:

Millions of Californians have already cast their ballot by mail, but millions more are expected to show up to the polls for early voting this weekend and on Election Day.

They’ll do this amid concerns about voter intimidation, social unrest and a statewide spike in coronavirus cases.

To answer questions about how to vote this year, including how to stay safe while voting in-person and what you can and can’t do at the polls, PolitiFact California spoke with election officials and experts. 

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When Will California’s Election Results Be Available? 

By Ashley Zavala, Fox 5, October 28, 2020

Excerpts:

More than a third of California voters have returned their ballots with less than a week before the election deadline. 

The latest numbers from Political Data Inc show 36% of California ballots have been returned as of Tuesday. 

“It’s going to really help process those ballots more rapidly and get us to final election results sooner than later,” Kim Alexander with the California Voting Foundation said. 

Results from those ballots aren’t being tallied up, they won’t be until Nov. 3.

County elections officials across the state are processing the incoming ballots to make sure they have verified signatures and are able to be scanned.

“Once the polls close, those ballots that are in house that have already been processed are the very first ballots that get counted,” Alexander said. 

By Julia Shapero, Daily Bruin, October 28, 2020

Young voters in California are more likely than older voters to have their vote-by-mail ballots rejected, a September study found.

The study, which was published by the California Voter Foundation, examined trends in rejected ballots across the state. Over the last decade, election officials rejected 1.7% of vote-by-mail ballots cast in statewide elections, according to the study. However, voters between the ages of 18 and 24 had their vote-by-mail ballots rejected at about three times the rate of older voters in the three counties studied, said Kim Alexander, president and founder of the California Voter Foundation.

Young voters have several factors working against them, said Alexander, who was a co-author on the study. When it comes to casting vote-by-mail ballots, young voters are more likely to be new to voting, unaccustomed to making signatures and unfamiliar with using the United States Postal Service, she added.

CBS 8, October 26, 2020

San Diego's CBS8 TV anchor Carlo Cecchetto speaks with Kim Alexander about CVF's rejected ballots study and vote-by-mail tips. (Full Video)

 

By Teri Sforza, San Jose Mercury News, October 26, 2020

Excerpts:

In the dramatic midterm elections of 2018, when the fate of the House and Senate hung in the balance and a new governor was about to be enthroned, two of every three votes tallied in California were cast via mail-in ballots rather than by in-person voting —even in the absence of a deadly pandemic.

By-mail voting has long played a dominant role in Golden State democracy, so the ballot-in-every-mailbox experiment currently underway is not so much revolution as evolution. But understanding the particulars of what happened to mail ballots in California’s 2018 election — how many were sent to voters, how many were never returned, how many were rejected and why? — can help prepare for an unprecedented Nov. 3, when counting commences on what may well be the weirdest Election Day in American history.

By Lara Korte, The Sacramento Bee, October 23, 2020

Excerpts:

Californians have until Nov. 3 to return their mail ballots, but elections officials and experts are encouraging voters to do it sooner rather than later. 

Waiting risks mishaps that could lead to a ballot not being counted.

During the March primaries, California counties were unable to count 100,000 mail ballots, and many were rejected because they did not arrive at elections offices on time, according to county data compiled by the Secretary of State’s Office. Legislators hoping to ameliorate the problem extended the deadline for receiving ballots from three days after the election to 17 days.

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